What we cover | What we don't cover

All insurance policies have exclusions. Unlike other insurers though, we want to highlight some of the things you probably won't be covered for. If you are still in doubt, please don't hesitate to ask us a question.

Come on, don't be silly.

Look, riding a Harley overseas when you are drunk, high and don't have a helmet probably isn't the brightest thing to do. Leaping off a third floor balcony into the pool below might seem like a fun thing to do when you are 18 and overseas, except when you miss!

Neither of these events would be covered, even though there might be a travel insurance policy in place.

Insurance is there to cover things that may happen, not things that most probably will. Motorcycles are bad enough - throw in drink, drugs and no helmet, and you're almost guaranteed a trip to the hospital. The same goes for jumping from third floor balconies.

We witness enough tragedies as it is, so PLEASE think about your personal safety, your experience and your limits when you travel. It doesn't matter whether you are 19 and it's your first trip overseas or 59 and have seen half the world, don't do things that are plain stupid.

We are here to look out for you so if you are unsure, email us info@tid.co.nz about where you are going, and we'll help you about what to look out for and what to avoid.

Alcohol is dangerous. Even on holiday.

In many parts of the world, it isn't muggers you've got to worry about: crossing a street in Hanoi is hard enough when you are stone-cold sober and have your wits about you, but after a bottle of wine or a beer or two your judgement is impaired, sometimes with serious consequences. If something happens and alcohol is a factor, any claim is likely to be denied.

It happens.

From being hit by a Tuk-Tuk to people stumbling off cliffs, people have accidents more often after alcohol.

Yes, we know that most people enjoy a drink while on holiday but you aren't covered for any claim where alcohol is a factor.

Some people want to take your stuff. So take care.

A good way to think about this is to ask yourself whether you'd behave this way if you didn't have travel insurance?

So, you left your iPhone on a table in a bar while you went to the toilet and it wasn't there when you returned. Or you put your bag down beside your chair in a restaurant and it gets stolen. Yep, same as in New Zealand. Happens all the time. Are you really surprised? If that happens in New Zealand why be surprised when that also happens in some country where the average daily wage is often less than $100?

You aren't covered if you leave items unsupervised in a public place and they get stolen, and this can mean anything from a beach to an airport or an art gallery to a hotel lobby.

It is your responsibility to take reasonable care of your belongings when you travel. We'll take care of the rest.

And if something does get lost or stolen, you need to get a written report from the Police. Without this we can't accept a claim.

Thongs, shorts and motorcycles really don't mix.

Firstly, while the idea might seem appealing, if you have absolutely no training and no experience at handling a two-wheeled machine at home, what makes you think you’ll magically acquire those skills in a foreign country, where the roads are shoddy, the vehicles dodgy, and the congestion is mind-boggling?

Secondly, while thousands of visitors each year rent a motorcycle or scooter and ride around Southeast Asia totally unlicensed, if you don't have a proper licence and have a crash it’s pretty straightforward; you’re riding illegally and you’re not covered.

Some experiences we just don't cover

While there are lots of fun and exciting things to do overseas, like those amazing winged-suit base jumps, if you deliberately put your life in danger or don't take reasonable care then you probably won't be covered.

In fact we don't cover most high-adrenalin activities be they in the air (Winged suit base jump, Parachuting, Skydiving, Hang Gliding), on the snow (Bobsleighing, Snowrafting, Heli-skiing, Ski Acrobatics, Ski Joreing, Power Assisted Skiing, off-piste skiing and off-piste snowboarding activities), Mountaineering or anything involving ropes.

That's not to say don't do them - but we won't be there to pick up the pieces.

What if I'm pregnant?

Congratulations! But there are some rules that you need to consider if you are going to travel when you are pregnant. You aren't covered for childbirth overseas, even if it is premature, nor are you covered for pregnancy or related complications if you travel after 26 weeks, so don't plan to travel in the last trimester. Unfortunately we don't offer coverage for multiple pregnancies (ie twins or more), or for pregnancies arising from IVF or other assisted reproductive programs.

Should I still travel?

We all look forward to our own travel plans, but occasionally circumstances conspire to throw these plans into disarray. The New Zealand Government provides good free travel advice - check their advice on where you are going before you leave, and listen to it.

If they advise against travel to a country (e.g. Somalia) or even to a region or part of a country (like the Gaza Strip), and you choose to ignore that advice, you do so at your peril. You won't be covered if you go there and anything happens to you.

Equally, if you decide for whatever reason that your chosen destination no longer sounds like the sort of place you want to visit but there isn't a New Zealand Government warning of 'EXTREME RISK' to that country or region, you aren't covered for cancellation costs simply because you've changed your mind.

We are here to look out for you so if you are unsure, email us info@tid.co.nz about where you are going, and we'll help you about what to look out for and what to avoid.

When should I stay off the streets?

From yet another coup in Thailand to student protests in China, riots and civil unrest are dangerous. Wandering around streets full of excited people or when grenades are being thrown around (true story) really isn't a good idea, and you're probably not covered if you could have reasonably avoided the unrest. You definitely aren't covered if you take part and get hurt.

Interesting as it might be, if you find yourself in this situation, get off the streets and contact us for advice about what to do next.

Don't take home more than you bargained for

If you meet a 'friend' to engage in sexual activity and as a result wake up in the morning with no bag, passport and a headache, it could still get a whole lot worse. Not only do we not cover claims arising from Sexually Transmitted Diseases (STDs) but you could die from any number of infections.